ALP Unveils Election-Year Environment Policy

Author’s note: This article is intended news, not an endorsement for any political party. Best Practice will report in equal depth on the Coalition’s energy policy.

Australian Labor Party leader Bill Shorten has unveiled his party’s proposed energy policy, which will adopt Malcolm Turnbull’s National Energy Guarantee (NEG), and adds billions of investment in renewable energy and consumer incentives.

Heading into the 2019 federal election, climate and energy policy are sure to prove key touch-points with local constituents. In acknowledgement of that fact, Labor has released details of its official energy policy, which will consolidate upon the NEG implemented by former-PM Malcolm Turnbull, and add new solar, wind and hydroelectric projects across the board.

Mr Shorten is committing his party and potential Labor government to a 45 per cent reduction in domestic emissions by 2030, based on 2005 levels of emissions. This is in addition to spending promises on renewable energy projects, “with the Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC) to have its funding topped up to $10-billion.” According to the ABC

Labor has also pledged a further $5 billion for a new “energy modernisation fund” which

“The answer lies in renewables.” Shadow Energy Minister, Mark Butler told RenewEconomy.

Further rebates will be available to Australian home and business owners looking to implement environmentally-sustainable renewable technologies, like the installation of batteries storing energy from photovoltaic cells. Mr Shorten “is expected to argue that increased battery storage will improve the reliability of the electricity grid”, according to Andrew Probyn’s report.

Labor is proposing a means-tested rebate of $2,000 for homes installing solar cells and a battery pack, and hopes it will facilitate tripling the number of homes using renewable technologies to power their home. This is in addition to a $100-million pledge to expand support systems for solar installation in lower-income households.

The national energy guarantee was initially backed by the Coalition’s energy minister, Josh Frydenberg, and supported twice by the Liberal party room before being abandoned by the party in August due to infighting.

Speaking about the adoption of the Coalition’s national energy guarantee, Shadow Energy Minister Mark Butler told the ABC’s AM program: “We remain committed to a bipartisan solution, if that is possible… We’re willing to work with them, but we’re not willing to wait for them.” He said.

Speaking of the proposed investments and subsidies in household renewables, minister Butler said “it’s great for individual households, but beyond that, being able to shift that energy from the middle of the day to the early evening is going to be fantastic for the whole energy system.”

“It will relieve pressure that’s currently placed on the grid when everyone gets home, particularly on hot evenings, and turns their air conditioner on.”

Speaking about the adoption of the Coalition’s national energy guarantee, Shadow

Energy Minister Mark Butler told the ABC’s AM program: “We remain committed to a bipartisan solution, if that is possible… We’re willing to work with them, but we’re not willing to wait for them.” He said.

Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • YouTube Best Practice Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Instagram Social Icon
  • Twitter Basic Square

© 2020 by Best Practice

  • White YouTube Icon
  • White LinkedIn Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon