Senegal is Constructing a Wind Farm Set to Power 2-Million Homes.



Reports are circulating that the largest wind farm in West Africa is currently under construction, with plans to supply up to 158-megawatts of clean energy to more than two million homes in Senegal.


Construction of the €340-million ‘Taliba N’Diaye’ wind farm is underway, with 50-megawatts of energy already being provided to the country’s grid via the dozen or so wind turbines already in use, 100-kilometers north of the capital, Dakar.


The project is part of President Macky Sall’s ‘Emerging Senegal’ plan, which has been designed to bring Senegal into the forefront of sustainable development and underpin its economy with clean energy.


When completed in just a few month’s time, the wind farm’s 46 wind turbines will provide 158-megawatts of clean energy to the grid, increasing Senegal’s electricity supply by 15%, and offsetting around 300,000 tonnes of carbon emissions each year. Each turbine is capable of producing around 3.45MW of electricity to the grid.


The project is being spearheaded by Lekela Power, and has been part-funded by the US Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), as well as the Danish Export Credit Agency (MIGA) and the United States Agency of International Development Power Africa.


Massaer Cisse, General Manager for Senegal at Lekela Power and the wind farm’s manager said that “the first megawatts of energy are today entering Senegal’s grid, giving the country its first taste of clean, renewable power.”


“This is an exciting time and it brings us a step closer to our ultimate goal of providing power for millions of Senegalese,” Cisse concluded.



“This lack of electricity contributes to the low manufacturing output and high unemployment rates in the continent. For instance, it has been reported that Nigeria suffers a yearly 5% loss in GDP due to erratic power supply.” - Africa Happenings



The African continent is a prime candidate for electricity sourced from renewable sources, according to Africa Happening’s Akenaten, who writes that “Africa has tremendous potential for renewable energy. For instance, the Inga falls in the DRC has the potential to power half the continent. The continent also has year-round sunlight ideal for solar energy. Although the continent is blessed with massive energy resources, it is not being utilised to the maximum. As a result, more than 500 million Africans lack access to electricity.”


“This lack of electricity contributes to the low manufacturing output and high unemployment rates in the continent. For instance, it has been reported that Nigeria suffers a yearly 5% loss in GDP due to erratic power supply. Consequently, most Nigerians use back-up generators for their homes and businesses. This negatively affects the environment and health of the people through the pollution from generator fumes.”

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